A Bounty of Books from New England

Pin It

Deborah M. from New Hampshire sent boxes of delightful cookbooks.  There were vintage, classic, and newer books.  There were also some that were replacements from books that were lost in a flood of The Culinary Cellar.  Look at all these great titles.

 

Love Sara Moulton and a couple of the iconic Molly Katzen books.

I was thrilled to have a replacement of the Hollyhocks & Radishes from a favorite author.

This one is a new favorite from members of the Mystic Seaport Community.  I hold a special place for New England cookbooks and traditional foods since many of my ancestors settled in New England in the 1600’s.  Can you imagine back then how the early colonists had to learn to cook some unfamiliar foods such as pumpkins, corn, clams, and cranberries?  From these roots the recipes in this cookbook range from our country’s beginnings to modern recipes using the bounty that is New England.  You will want to work a little “Yankee Magic” as you look through this book.

I am a big fan of smoked fish and a recipe for a smoked fish dip appealed to me right away.  Even though the title calls for smoked bluefish, smoked whitefish works just as well. The dip is so good, especially with rye crackers, although you can use assorted vegetables or toasted baguette slices too.

Thank you, Deborah for all the cookbooks and for a smoked fish recipe that I will make again and again!

Block Island Smoked Bluefish Dip
Author: 
 
Ingredients
  • ½ cup sour cream
  • ½ cup block-style cream cheese, softened (4 ounces, half of an 8-ounce block)
  • 2 Tablespoons whipping cream
  • 1-1/2 Tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 Tablespoons chopped fresh dill
  • ½ teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • ½ teaspoon Old Bay Seasoning
  • 4 drops hot pepper sauce
  • 1 pound smoked bluefish or smoked whitefish, flaked with a fork
  • 2 Tablespoons chopped fresh chives for garnish, or fresh dill sprigs
  • Rye crackers, assorted fresh vegetables, and/or toasted baguette slices for serving
Instructions
  1. Beat together the first ten ingredients (sour cream through hot pepper sauce) until well-blended, Fold in all but about a half-cup of the fish into dip.
  2. Transfer to a serving bowl and garnish the top with reserved fish pieces, and chives or dill sprigs, Serve with rye crackers, vegetables, or toasted baguette slices.

 

, , ,

6 Responses to A Bounty of Books from New England

  1. Denise May 22, 2020 at 8:22 pm #

    It looks like many wonderful additions to your collection! What a generous and thoughtful gift!

    • Debbie May 23, 2020 at 8:00 pm #

      It was, Denise! I have the best readers.

  2. Yvonne May 23, 2020 at 9:21 am #

    Hey there,

    I’m so glad that you’re feeling better and are posting again.

    The Fanny Farmer cookbook (Boston Cooking School) is definitely a New England classic here in N.H. I remember my mother and grandmothers having copies and I got one when I married. And I am tickled pink to know that a fellow N.H. cook reads you blog, too.

    The Mystic Seaport cookbook makes me long for the pandemic quarantines to be lifted so we can travel safely. On a trip a while ago I picked up the Christmas Memories Cookbook from the Mystic Seaport Museum. I’m going to find it now read, it’s really interesting. Sigh…

    Take care and say healthy!
    Yvonne
    -=^..^=-

    • Debbie May 23, 2020 at 8:06 pm #

      Thank you, Yvonne! I love the Fannie Farmer classic too, and have one of the really old ones. In fact, that book was the subject of my very first blog, over ten years ago. I bet the Christmas Memories book is a good one.

  3. MichelleinRI July 21, 2020 at 4:22 pm #

    Hi Debbie!

    Mystic is a lovely town not far from where I grew up. Maybe you’ll see it someday!

    Michelle

    • Debbie July 23, 2020 at 12:02 am #

      Michelle, I would love to visit Mystic someday. My daughter has been there and said it’s lovely. How nice you grew up in such a wonderful area.

Leave a Reply

Rate this recipe: